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African Violet

Saintpaulia
Small, compact African Violets have soft, furry, dark green leaves, with beautiful delicate flowers that bloom all year. Traditionally single-color flowers of blue/violet, pink, fuchsia, or white flowers, newer cultivars have double and bi-colored flowers. African Violets can be “miniatures” about 6” in diameter or standard sized 8”-12” in diameter, two perfect sizes for a desk or gift.
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Quick Facts

  • Attractive flowers and foliage
  • Non-toxic
  • Easy care

Details

Small, compact African Violets have soft, furry, dark green leaves, with beautiful delicate flowers that bloom all year. Traditionally single-color flowers of blue/violet, pink, fuchsia, or white flowers, newer cultivars have double and bi-colored flowers. African Violets can be “miniatures” about 6” in diameter or standard sized 8”-12” in diameter, two perfect sizes for a desk or gift.

Weight:

Variation:

Container Size:

About This Plant

Type

Houseplants

Plant Safety

This plant is pet friendly and non-toxic. More information here.

Leaf Color

Green

Flowering

Flowering

Mature Height

Up to 6 inches

Mature Width

Up to 9 inches

Data Source

Copyright © 2019 Houseplant 411.com LLC. All rights reserved. All plant information is copyrighted by Houseplant411.com LLC and may not be copied or distributed without obtaining prior written approval.

California residents please see Prop 65 WARNING

Seasonality

Bloom Color

Assorted

Plant Care Tips

Planting Instructions
African violets should be repotted whenever they become root-bound, roughly every six months. Select a new container one size larger than the current container (for example a violet in a 2-inch container can be potted up into a 3-inch container). The best containers to use have a height roughly 3/4 of their width, but any similarly shallow container will do. African violets need a very light, porous, potting soil. Remove roughly half the leaves, starting from the bottom with the oldest leaves, and flowers, leaving only the younger, healthier leaves. This will leave a short neck at the base of the plant. Next, remove the violet from its container and gently massage away much of the old soil and about half the root system. Fill the bottom of the new container with fresh, damp, potting soil. Holding the violet over the pot, tilt it to one side and fill in with fresh soil. Tilt the plant to the other side and finish filling in with fresh soil. This should result in a mound of soil slightly above the rim of the container, with the violet buried to the top of the neck, where the leaves begin. With your fingers under the foliage, gently press the mound of soil down flush with the pot rim. Water your newly repotted violet lightly for the next several weeks while the roots are growing into the new soil. Indoor plants can be especially prone to rot from overwatering at this point.
General Care Description
African Violet plants do best and flower more in bright indirect light, close to an east-facing window is ideal. When the light is too low, the leaves turn dark green, lose their plump appearance, and the plant produces very few flowers. The leaves turn a pale yellow-green and the flowers fade quickly when there is too much light. Allow the top 1inch- 2inch of soil to dry out before watering. Avoid using water that has passed through a softener or water containing chlorine or fluoride. Always water African Violet houseplants from the bottom to prevent water getting on the leaves. Remove any excess water that is still in the saucer after 15 minutes. Special fertilizer for African Violet plants is available wherever plants are sold. In a pinch, you can use any balanced, soluble, houseplant food diluted to 1/2 the recommended strength. Feed African Violets monthly when the plant is actively growing. Over-fertilizing causes leaf tip burn, poor flower production, leaf cracks, and may even kill an African Violet plant.

Effort of Care

Moderate

Soil Type

African Violets like a rich, airy, potting medium. Special African Violet soil is available at most garden centers. These plants should be re-potted every 6-12 months using fresh soil to prevent unwanted salt build-up.

Humidity

Moderate

Temperature

These plants do well in temperatures of 75°-80°F (23.9°-26.7C) during the day and about 10° cooler at night. Keep African Violet plants away from cold drafts and heating vents.

Growth Rate

Slow

Light Needs

African Violet plants do best and flower more in bright indirect light, close to an east-facing window is ideal. When the light is too low, the leaves turn dark green, lose their plump appearance, and the plant produces very few flowers. The leaves turn a pale yellow-green and the flowers fade quickly when there is too much light.

Water Needs

Allow the top 1-2 inches of soil to dry out before watering. Avoid using water that has passed through a softener or water containing chlorine or fluoride. Always water African Violet houseplants from the bottom to prevent water getting on the leaves. Remove any excess water that is still in the saucer after 15 minutes.

Disease and Pests

African Violets are susceptible to botrytis, powdery mildew, and erwinia blight. Preventing plants from getting diseases is much easier than treating the diseases once they appear. Provide good air circulation and never get water on the leaves. This will help prevent diseases from infecting your plants. Spider mites and Mealy Bugs are two houseplant pests that attack African Violet plants. Use a Qtip dipped in alcohol or Neem Oil to treat these insects as soon as they appear. Since the leaves of African Violet Plants are easily damaged, only use commercial insecticides that are recommended for African Violets.

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